OnCUE

Author - John Cradler

CUE Legislative Update – August 2019

Legislative Advocacy
New California Budget Allocates Increased Funding for Education and Technology Infrastructure

According to Governor Newson, the 2019-2020 California Budget makes an historic investment in education for Californians, paving the path towards universal preschool, recruiting and retaining qualified educators and facilitating tuition freezes at the UC and CSU. Education leaders largely praised the education budget.

“The governor successfully held true to principles he laid out in January and got significant wins across the board,” said Kevin Gordon, president of Capitol Advisors Group. “He found creative ways to address crucial issues that educators statewide are articulating.” Almost half of the 2019-2020 state budget, will be spent on funding education.

Comment: It should be noted that even with the increases in education funding for 2019-2020, California still lags behind the rest of the nation in K-12 per-pupil spending (39th out of 50 states according to Education Week on June 5, 2019).

California Budget Headlines

  • Makes highest-ever investment in K-14 education, including approximately $5,000 more per K-12 pupil than eight years ago.
  • Invests $90 million to recruit and retain qualified educators to teach in a high-need field at priority schools and address California’s teacher shortage.
  • Invests $43.8 million to provide training and resources for classroom teachers and paraprofessionals to build capacity around key state priorities.
  • Supports students with specialized needs by providing a 19.3-percent increase in funding for special education.
  • An increase of $2 billion Proposition 98 General Fund for the school district Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) to reflect a 3.46 percent cost-of-living adjustment and declining average daily attendance.
  • Introduces a “cradle-to-career” data system that will track students from preschool to college and into the workforce.
  • Full-day kindergarten classes will be expanded as the budget gives schools $300 million to do so, while $377 million will be placed in a cash reserve fund for future school funding.
  • Allocates $103.4 billion for school districts who have been plagued with budget cutbacks since the 2008 recession, as well as $687 million to pay education debts.

State Education Budget Trailer Bill: SB 75 is a Trailer Bill to the approved Budget and includes but is not limited to the following:

  1. School Leadership Academy. Establishes the 21st Century California School Leadership Academy, administered by the CDE and the California Collaborative for Educational Excellence (CCEE) to provide professional learning opportunities for school administrators and other school leaders, aligned with the statewide system of support. Eligible grantees include LEAs, institutions of higher education and nonprofit educational service providers.
  2. Broadband Infrastructure Grant Program. This bill would apropriate $7,500,000 from the General Fund to the Controller for allocation to the State Department of Education for the Broadband Infrastructure Grant Program to improve broadband connectivity at California local educational agencies and improve digital learning opportunities for pupils, as provided.
  3. Educator Workforce Grant Program. Provides $38.1 million in one-time non-Proposition 98 funding for the Educator Workforce Investment Grant to provide competitive grants for professional learning opportunities for teachers and paraprofessionals. The CDE is charged with administering grants to one or more institutions of higher education or nonprofit organizations with expertise in developing and providing professional learning to teachers and paraprofessionals. Of this funding, $10 million is for professional development for the English Learner Roadmap adopted by the SBE, $5 million is for special education related professional development and $22.1 million for professional development in other areas. These other areas include social-emotional learning, positive school climate, the computer science content standards and the ethnic studies model curriculum. Provides the CDE $250,000 each year for four years to implement the Educator Workforce Investment Grant program.
  4. California Computer Science Coordinator. Appropriates $38,100,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Education for the 2019–20 fiscal year to create the California Computer Science Coordinator as a position in the department and to establish the Educator Workforce Investment Grant Program to support one or more competitive grants for professional learning opportunities for teachers and paraprofessionals across the state, as provided.

Federal Communications Commission action has negative impact on education: FCC Eliminates Educational Broadband Service (EBS)

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently voted along party lines to auction off part of the wireless spectrum currently assigned to its Educational Broadband Service. Education advocates are deriding the decision, which will go into effect next year, as shortsighted. It provoked an outcry among education groups, who argued that the decision would reduce home internet access for students in rural areas—thereby widening the homework gap. Opponents of the measure say that it strikes a blow to rural broadband access, particularly for homes, and thus misses a crucial opportunity to help close the homework gap. The FCC order removes any educational requirements from companies, schools or institutions that obtain licenses for the spectrum. Previously, EBS spectrum was only licensed to educational institutions, barring a few exceptions.
Comment: Keith Krueger, CEO of the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) issued a statement on the FCC vote changing educational broadband service: “For those who care about rural education, this is a big disappointment,” says. “We are deeply disappointed by today’s FCC decision – a loss for teachers and students especially for rural community learners. This action is inconsistent with public interest. The day EBS died. sigh.” FCC Commissioner, Jessica Rosenworcel commented: “The Kennedy Administration did something visionary. It set aside wireless spectrum for educational use, to explore how learning and technology could combine. Today the FCC burns this policy down, I dissent.”


Federal Legislation

“Save the Net” Update: Federal Net Neutrality Legislation. The Consortium on School Networking (CoSN) along with The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Fight for the Future, BattleForTheNet, and many others are advocating support of S.682. Thirty-four states introduced 120 bills and resolutions regarding net neutrality in the 2018 legislative session. Five states, including California, have enacted legislation or adopted net neutrality resolutions.

Recently, Congresswoman Anna Eshoo (CA) and FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel conducted a Town Hall meeting in Mountain View, CA which focused on the importance of Net Neutrality. Anna Eshoo and Jessica Rosenworcel provided major leadership in the Country to educate policy makers and the public about the critical need to restore Net Netrality. Jessica received the CUE Advocacy Award and Anna Eshoo was co-author of the HR 1644 and played major role in advocating for its support.

  • Status: The Save the Internet Act (S.682) is being held in the U.S. Senate by Senator McConnell.

H.R. 1328, Access Broadband Act. A bill to expand broadband, as well as create a simpler process to access federal broadband resources and bring better coordination to federal efforts to expand broadband access in underserved areas.

  • Status: Passed the U.S. House of Representatives with a companion bill (S.1167) introduced in the Senate.

Digital Equity Act of 2019. Introduced by U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) The Digital Equity Act of 2019 S.1167 would authorize more than $1 billion in Federal grant funding over the next five years to support digital inclusion programs throughout U.S. states and territories.

  • Status: Referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

ESSA Title-IV, Part A with proposed increase passes the House. A Coalition which includes CoSN, ISTE, SETDA, and others actively supports the increase.

  • Status: This budget increase will need to be heard and approved the Senate and then the White House.

California Education Technology Related Legislation

Update on the CUE-Initiated Educational Technology Resolution, ACR 268

The Resolution is clear evidence that the State Legislature made a formal commitment to making educational technology support and access a major priority. We are collaborating with CDE Staff members Geoff Belleau, Technology Consultant, and Mary Nicely, Supt. Thurmond’s Chief Policy Advisor, as well as with a representative of the Governor, the Policy Advisor to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction (SSPI), a Member of the State Board of Education (SBE), the Director of the California Emerging Technology Fund (CETF), the CEO of the Silicon Valley Education Foundation (SVEF), Napa COE Superintendent, Barbara Nemko, and Legislative Advocacy Committee Co-Chair, Ann Kruze, to discuss next steps for implementing the ACR 268 recommendations.

Presently I am preparing draft legislation based on the ACR 268 recommendations, in collaboration with Legislative Advocacy Committee members, Ann Kruze, Barbara Nemko, Rowland Baker, and with Geoff Belleau and Mary Nicely representing the SSPI, which would help define the agenda for the proposed Educational Technology Summit. The Summit may consist of a group of about 20 participants representing the Legislature, Governor, and the SSPI along with representatives of State Education Associations and Foundations to be determined.

If you have specific questions about ACR 268 contact John Cradler at cradler@earthlink.net.


New California bills:

The following bills were introduced in the California Legislature in January for the 2019 Legislative session. These bills are reported if they generally relate to the CUE Advocacy Platform. Most bills will be amended several times as they pass through various committees. Most of the bills listed are still in progress. To review bills and there current analysis and status click here.

AB 52, Assembly Member Mark Berman, Computer science strategic implementation plan. This bill would require the computer science strategic implementation plan to be updated every 7 years. The bill also would make these provisions apply indefinitely.

  • Status: Passed Assembly Education Committee, now on hold (suspense) in Appropriations Committee.

AB 578, Assembly Member, Kevin Mullin. The California STEM Teaching Pathway Act of 2019. The bill would appropriate $2,000,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Education for the 2019–20 fiscal year for purposes of the bill, to be allocated as a one-time grant to a postsecondary educational institution, nonprofit public benefit corporation, county office of education, or a partnership of multiple organizations of these types.

  • Status: Passed Assembly Education Committee, now on hold in Appropriations Committee

AB 1366, Assembly Member, Lorena Gonzalez. Voice over Internet Protocol and Internet Protocol enabled communications services. This bill would require that no department, agency, commission, or political subdivision of the state, including the PUC, shall enact, adopt, or enforce any law, rule, regulation, ordinance, standard, order, or other provision having the force or effect of law, that regulates VoIP or other IP enabled service. The bill was also amended to require the commission to annually report to the Legislature and the Attorney General the number and type of complaints the commission received from VoIP customers about VoIP service.

Comment: The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) states that this bill abandons oversight over broadband band monopolies. The recently introduced A.B. 1366 mirrors the FCC’s abandonment of consumers with one exception—California fought to establish its own net neutrality rules under S.B. 822 passed last year. Apart from that, A.B. 1366 removes any semblance of the state promoting competition for broadband access through its state regulator, the California Public Utility Commission (the state version of an FCC). Instead, it appears to just hope that our cable monopolies will be benevolent. This was changed to state that the PUC would not enact Internet regulations that are already established by the FCC.

  • Status: Passed the Assembly: Introduced in the Senate, committee hearing delayed.

SB 2, Senators Glazer and Allen, Statewide Longitudinal Student-Database. This bill would express the intent of the Legislature to establish the Statewide Longitudinal Student-Database to collect and store data regarding individual students as they matriculate through P–20, as defined, and into the workforce.

  • Status: Passed the Senate and waiting to be considered by the Assembly.

AB 1409, Assembly Member, Ed Chau. Digital Divide Grant Program. The bill would authorize grants to be awarded to fund the use of broadband for the installation of broadband, broadband service, equipment, administrative implementation, and maintenance for homework gap projects.

  • Status: Passed Assembly Communications and Conveyance Committee: now on hold (suspense) in the Assembly Appropriations Committee.

CUE Advocacy Strategy: As opportunities arise, CUE continues to be proactive in the development, co-development, sponsorship, and support of state and Federal legislation and resolutions which are consistent with the CUE Legislative Advocacy Platform. The CUE Legislative Advocacy Committee (LAC) meets periodically to take positions on relevant bills, resolutions, policies, and other related actions suggested by the CUE Legislative Consultant, Board Members, staff, and Committee members. Anyone who is interested in being involved in supporting the CUE advocacy effort should contact Mary Kopp, CUE Senior Program Manager, mkopp@cue.org or John Cradler, cradler@earthlink.net For earlier Legislative Updates, click here.  

To sign up for breaking legislative advocacy news and updates, subscribe to our email list by signing up here: cue.org/leg-updates.

CUE Legislative Update – May 2019

Legislative Advocacy
Save the Net Update: Federal Net Neutrality Legislation

House and Senate Democratic leaders held a press conference on April 10th, chaired by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, on Capitol Hill to unveil legislation aimed at restoring net neutrality rules established in 2015 which were repealed by the FCC in December 2017. Pelosi noted that 86 percent of Americans oppose this assault on net neutrality. Among the speakers at the press conference were Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), and Congresswoman Anna Eshoo (D-CA). Speaker Pelosi noted that California is the first State to have passed its own (CUE supported) legislation to restore net neutrality, SB 822, by CA Senator Scott Wiener which she actively supported. Nancy Pelosi’s remarks at the press event can be found here.

Save the Net House Bill Passed: Congressman, Mike Doyle introduced the Save the Internet Act (H.R. 1644) on March 8th, which would reverse the FCC’s repeal of critical net neutrality protections in late 2017 by codifying the FCC’s 2015 Open Internet Order. According to Congresswoman Eshoo, a co-author of HR 1644, the bill would reinstate provisions to prohibit internet service providers from the blocking or throttling of web content, or from selling “fast lanes” to content companies for special and speedier access to consumers. The legislation would also return the FCC with authority to crack down on instances when internet providers discriminate in the way that they handle web traffic. The Save the Internet Act bill with updates can be found here. After a long debate and with 12 amendments, HR 1644 passed the House 232 to 190 on April 10.

Save the Net Senate Bill Introduced: The bill has moved to the U.S. Senate as S.682, where it will face major challenges and require much advocacy by its supporters. The bill was referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation for consideration with 45 co-sponsors.

The Consortium on School Networking submitted a support letter for the CUE resolution, AJR 7, to save net neutrality, E-Rate, and Life Line. CoSN is publically advocate supporting HR1644 and now for S.682. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Fight for the Future, BattleForTheNet, and many others are advocating support of S.682. Thirty-four states introduced 120 bills and resolutions regarding net neutrality in the 2018 legislative session. Five states, including California, have enacted legislation or adopted resolutions.

H.R. 1328, Access Broadband Act: The U.S. House of Representatives approved a bill originally co-sponsored by U.S. Rep. Paul Tonko, D-New York, that would help expand broadband, as well as create a simpler process to access federal broadband resources and bring better coordination to federal efforts to expand broadband access in underserved areas. The Access Broadband Act was adopted by unanimous voice vote after being introduced by Tonko and Republican U.S. Rep. Susan W. Brooks of Indiana. According to Tonko, about 25 percent of all school districts in the country and about 25 percent of rural residents nationwide lack broadband internet and stated that:

“Reliable broadband internet access is an integral part of our American economy and modern way of life. Whether for students doing homework, job-seekers training for a new career, doctors reading a medical scan or entrepreneurs starting a small business, we need to make sure that nobody is being left behind.”

The bill would establish a federal Office of Internet Connectivity and Growth that would hold regional workshops on best practices and access strategies, consult with other agencies to develop a universal application for broadband access assistance, regardless of the federal agency involved, and coordinate among the FCC, Rural Utility Service of the Department of Agriculture and other internet support providers.

  • Status: Passed the U.S. House of Representatives with a companion bill (S.1167) introduced in the Senate.

Digital Equity Act of 2019. Introduced by U.S. Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) The Digital Equity Act of 2019 S.1167 would authorize more than $1 billion in Federal grant funding over the next five years to support digital inclusion programs throughout U.S. states and territories. Senator Murray’s groundbreaking bill would create two major Federal grant programs, operated by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), to promote digital equity nationwide. The proposed funding for each program is $125 million per year for five years — a total of up to $1.25 billion. One program would be carried out through state governments, with funding allocated by formula, and would incorporate state-by-state digital equity planning followed by implementation grants to qualifying programs.

  • Status: Referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

Educational Broadband Service (EBS). Over 800 public interest, education and commercial signatories emphasize that keeping EBS is vital to close the homework gap. As of May 8, 2019, 830 signatories representing educational institutions, rural operators, public libraries, nonprofit organizations, anchor institutions, individuals and public interest groups from 48 states and the District of Columbia united in petitioning the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to ensure Educational Broadband Service (EBS) continues to serve its intended educational and public interest purposes. EBS is a critical tool for addressing the “homework gap,” or the systematic inequality arising from a student’s inability to access the Internet to complete homework. In 2015, the National Center for Education Statistics reported that 80 percent of eighth-graders used a computer for schoolwork on a weekday, though 7 million American students still lack home Internet access. Today, educators use EBS to combat the digital divide and homework gap by building their own broadband networks, creating mobile hotspot lending programs, and providing Wi-Fi on school buses.

  • Comment: The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) and the Consortium on School Networking (CoSN) are members of a coalition that is actively encouraging the FCC to recognize the potential of EBS to close persistent broadband connectivity gaps and support digital learning for all students both on and off campus.

ESSA Title-IV, Part A with proposed increase passes the House. The Title IV-A Coalition has been strongly advocating for the House’s FY 2020 LHHS-Ed appropriations bill, which now includes $1.32 billion for the Student Support and Academic Enrichment (SSAE) grant program, authorized under Title IV, Part A of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The Title IV-A Coalition is extremely grateful to the House LHHS-Education Subcommittee for the proposed $1.32 billion, an increase of $150 million over the enacted FY19 level, for the bipartisan Student Support and Academic Enrichment block grant program. The Coalition includes CoSN, ISTE, SETDA, and others. This budget increase will need to be heard and approved the Senate and then the POTUS.

  • Comment: On April 10th, CUE participated the EdTech Advocacy and Policy Summit, co-sponsored by ISTE, CoSN, and SETDA which focused on ESSA Title-IV, Part A. CUE was represented by John Cradler, Ruthmary Cradler as well as Andrea Bennet who represented CETPA. Together, we talked to members of Congress about the need to increase ESSA funding as well as to support the Save the Net Act.

Update on the CUE-Initiated Educational Technology Resolution, ACR 268

On August 30, 2018, Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 268, by Assembly Members Tony Thurmond (now State Superintendent of Public Instruction), Kevin Mullin, and Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, passed by the State Assembly and Senate. ACR 268 was Chaptered September 11, 2018 as Resolution Chapter 221, Statutes of 2018. ACR 268 was initiated by Computer Using Educators (CUE) with support from other California education entities.

The Resolution is clear evidence that the State Legislature has made a formal commitment to making educational technology support and access a major priority. We are collaborating with a representative of the Governor, the Policy Advisor to the SSPI, a Member of the State Board of Education (SBE), the Director of the California Emerging Technology Fund (CETF), the CEO of the Silicon Valley Education Foundation (SVEF), the Napa COE Superintendent and LAC member, and CDE staff, to discuss next steps for implementing the ACR 268 recommendations. For more details about ACR 268 and other bills, click here. If you have specific questions about ACR 268 contact John Cradler at cradler@earthlink.net


New California Bills

The following bills were introduced in the California Legislature in January for the 2019 Legislative session. These bills are reported if they generally relate to the CUE Advocacy Platform. Most bills will be amended several times as they pass through various committees. To review all bills being introduced this session click here.

AB 52, Assembly Member Mark Berman, Computer science strategic implementation plan. Existing law, until July 31, 2020, requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to convene a computer science strategic implementation advisory panel with a specified membership to develop and submit recommendations for a computer science strategic implementation plan to the Superintendent, the State Board of Education, and the Legislature. This bill would require the computer science strategic implementation plan to be updated every 7 years. The bill also would make these provisions apply indefinitely.

  • Status: Passed Assembly Education Committee, Ayes: 6; Noes: 0; Abstain: 0;

AB 578, Assembly Member, Kevin Mullin. The California STEM Teaching Pathway Act of 2019. This bill would establish the California STEM Teaching Pathway for purposes of recruiting, preparing, supporting, and retaining qualified science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals, including military veterans, as mathematics, science, engineering, and computer science teachers in California. The bill would appropriate $2,000,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Education for the 2019–20 fiscal year for purposes of the bill, to be allocated as a one-time grant to a postsecondary educational institution, nonprofit public benefit corporation, county office of education, or a partnership of multiple organizations of these types.

  • Status: Assigned to Assembly Education Committee, Ayes: 7; Noes: 0; Abstain 0

AB 1699, Assembly Member, Marc Levine. Mobile Internet Service Providers and Public Safety. This bill would prohibit a mobile internet service provider from impairing or degrading the lawful internet traffic of its public safety customer accounts, subject to reasonable network management, during a state of emergency. The Legislature finds and declares that this act is adopted pursuant to the police power granted to the State of California under the United States Constitution and cannot be preempted by the Federal Communications Commission. This act is adopted to protect and promote the safety, life, public health, public convenience, general prosperity, and well-being of society, and the welfare of the state’s population and economy. This act to be implemented by the PUC, ensures police and emergency services personnel have access to all of the resources necessary for them to operate effectively during a state of emergency.

  • Comment: This bill establishes net neutrality rules to internet access for emergency situations such as the Mendocino fire when the internet provider decreased data connection, severely interfering with the fire departments ability to function effectively. However, it seems that this could also be applied to education as well when there is an emergency situation at a school site. AB 1336, by Assembly Member Gonzales, removes the authority of the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) to regulate internet providers which would make it impossible to be able to implement the provisions of AB 1699 which is adding a new regulation for the PUC to enforce.
  • Status: Assembly Communications and Conveyance: Ayes: 12: Noes: 0; Abstain: 1

AB 1366, Assembly Member, Lorena Gonzalez. Voice over Internet Protocol and Internet Protocol enabled communications services. This bill would require that no department, agency, commission, or political subdivision of the state, including the PUC, shall enact, adopt, or enforce any law, rule, regulation, ordinance, standard, order, or other provision having the force or effect of law, that regulates VoIP or other IP enabled service,

  • Comment: The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) states that this bill abandons oversight over broadband band monopolies. The recently introduced A.B. 1366 mirrors the FCC’s abandonment of consumers with one exception—California fought to establish its own net neutrality rules under S.B. 822 passed last year. Apart from that, A.B. 1366 removes any semblance of the state promoting competition for broadband access through its state regulator, the California Public Utility Commission (the state version of an FCC). Instead, it appears to just hope that our cable monopolies will be benevolent.
  • Status: Assigned to Assembly Communications and Conveyance Committee, Ayes: 13; Noes: 0; Abstain: 5;

SB 2, Senators Glazer and Allen, Statewide Longitudinal Student-Database. This bill would express the intent of the Legislature to establish the Statewide Longitudinal Student-Database to collect and store data regarding individual students as they matriculate through P–20, as defined, and into the workforce. The bill would require the commission to convene a review committee for purposes of advising the commission on the establishment, implementation, funding, and ongoing administration of the database. The bill would express the intent of the Legislature that the development of the database be substantially completed on or before July 1, 2022. The bill would prohibit the commission from implementing the database if there is a determination, after consultation with the review committee, that the commission is unable to obtain necessary, reliable, and relevant data or protect individual privacy rights and confidentiality of the data.

  • Status: Senate Appropriations Committee: Ayes: 6; Noes: 0; Abstain: 0

AB 1409, Assembly Member, Ed Chau. Digital Divide Grant Program. The bill would require the Public Utilities Commission to implement the Digital Divide Grant Program upon the commission projecting an account balance of $500,000 in the following calendar year. The bill would authorize those grants to also be awarded to fund the use of broadband services funded through the fund for homework gap projects and to fund the installation of broadband, broadband service, equipment, administrative implementation, and maintenance for homework gap projects. The bill would define “homework gap projects” as projects that provide elementary and high school pupils with after-school access to broadband, as specified. The bill would authorize digital divide pilot project grants for community technology programs involved in activities that include homework gap projects to support the goal of closing the digital divide.

  • Status: Assigned to Assembly Communications and Conveyance Committee: Ayes 12; Noes: 0; Abstain: 1.

AB 1303, Assembly Member, O’Donnell. California Career Technical Education Incentive Grant Program: Strong Workforce Program. This bill specifies that, upon appropriation by the Legislature, $450,000,000 shall be made available for the California Career Technical Education Incentive Grant (CTEIG) Program to CDE for the 2018–19 fiscal year and each fiscal year thereafter. The bill would require the Superintendent to also ensure a level of professional staffing within the department dedicated to career technical education, sufficient to effectively administer the program and other federal and state career technical education programs, as specified. The bill would add regional occupational centers or programs operated by county offices of education (COEs) to the entities authorized to be grant recipients under the program and, commencing with the 2019-20 fiscal year, reduce the required match from a grant recipient to a 1:1 match.

  • Status: Assigned to Assembly Education Committee: Ayes 12; Noes: 0.

AB 39 Assembly Members, Muratsuchi and McCarty. Local control funding formula funding increase. This bill would specify new, higher base grant amounts for the 2019–20 fiscal year, which would also increase the supplemental and concentration grant amounts and result in various other changes to funding calculations for purposes of the local control funding formula. This bill would express the intent of the Legislature to increase the base grants to amounts equal to the national average per-pupil funding level, as provided. The bill would express the intent of the Legislature to apply a cost-of-living adjustment above the specified cost-of-living adjustment described above for purposes of certain funding provisions.

  • Comment: ACSA is advocating amendments to add new targets for LCFF funding. An example could be to set aside funding the use of technology to support the overall Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP).
  • Status: Assigned to Assembly Appropriations Committee: Ayes 17; Noes 1.

SB 37, Assembly Member, Nancy Skinner. Corporate tax rates. This bill would increase the corporate income tax rate of the largest, most profitable corporations, and progressively increase the corporate tax rates on companies with large disparities between CEO pay and the pay of the average employee of the company. The bill would deposit the revenues derived from this tax into the General Fund, as specified, and would require those revenues to be used to offset the fiscal impact of any child tax credit and, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to support the expansions or improvements to early childhood programs and other educational programs.

  • Status: Senate Rules Committee: Not yet voted on.

CUE Advocacy Strategy: As opportunities arise, CUE continues to be proactive in the development, co-development, sponsorship, and support of state and Federal legislation and resolutions which are consistent with the CUE Legislative Advocacy Platform. The CUE Legislative Advocacy Committee (LAC) meets periodically to take positions on relevant bills, resolutions, policies, and other related actions suggested by the CUE Legislative Consultant, Board Members, staff, and Committee members. Anyone who is interested in being involved in supporting the CUE advocacy effort should contact Mary Kopp, CUE Senior Program Manager, mkopp@cue.org or John Cradler, cradler@earthlink.net For earlier Legislative Updates, click here

To sign up for breaking legislative advocacy news and updates, subscribe to our email list by signing up here: cue.org/leg-updates.

CUE Legislative Update – April 2019

Legislative Advocacy
Save the Internet: Federal Net Neutrality Legislation introduced

#SaveTheNetPress Conference: House and Senate Democratic leaders held a press conference, chaired by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, on Capitol Hill to unveil legislation aimed at restoring net neutrality rules established in 2015 which were repealed by the FCC in December 2017. Pelosi noted that 86 percent of Americans oppose this assault on net neutrality. Among the speakers at the press conference were Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), and Congresswoman Anna Eshoo (D-CA). Speaker Pelosi mentioned that California is the first State to have passed its own (CUE supported) legislation to restore net neutrality, SB 822, by CA Senator Scott Wiener which she actively supported. Nancy Pelosi’s remarks at the press event can be found here.

House Bill Introduced: Congressman, Mike Doyle introduced the Save the Internet Act (H.R. 1644) on March 8th, which would reverse the FCC’s repeal of critical net neutrality protections in late 2017 by codifying the FCC’s 2015 Open Internet Order. Since the FCC’s decision to end net neutrality, control of the Internet has been taken from the American people and handed over to Internet service providers (ISPs) that can now generate new profits by restricting access to what you can do on the Internet. Eshoo stated that the Save the Internet Act is a powerful bill that restores the internet as an open platform for content, speech, and information. The Internet is one of the greatest inventions in human history and it’s an American invention. It’s our responsibility to protect it as a force to drive innovation, expand our economy, and promote free speech in our democracy. No corporate entity should be able to manipulate it for their own advantage.”

According to Congresswoman Eshoo, a co-author of HR 1644, the bill would reinstate provisions to prohibit internet service providers from the blocking or throttling of web content, or from selling fast lanes to content companies to get special and speedier access to consumers. The legislation would also return the FCC with authority to crack down on instances when internet providers discriminate in the way that they handle web traffic. The Save the Internet Act bill with updates can be found here. Congresswoman Eshoo has stated she was encouraged by the documented support by the California Legislature for net neutrality provided by passage of the CUE-initiated, California Assembly Joint Resolution (AJR 7) asking the California Congressional Delegation and the POTUS to restore net neutrality. To read AJR 7 click here.

Jessica RosenworcelSupport for Net Neutrality: FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, opposed the repeal and stated: I will keep raising a ruckus to support net neutrality and I’m glad so many others are too. It is good news that Congress introduced new legislation to restore net neutrality. I’m all in for an open internet with open and unrestricted Internet access to homes and is necessary to help close the homework gap. CUE honored Jessica for her support net neutrality at its 2017 annual conference.

The Consortium on School Networking (CoSN) submitted a support letter for the CUE resolution, AJR 7, to save net neutrality, E-Rate, and Life Line and now CoSN is publically advocating support HR1644. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Fight for the Future, BattleForTheNet, and many others are advocating support of HR1644. Thirty-four states introduced 120 bills and resolutions regarding net neutrality in the 2018 legislative session. Five states, including California, have enacted legislation or adopted resolutions.

Current Status of HR 1644: After long debate and with 12 amendments, HR 1644 passed the House 232 to 190 on Wednesday April 10. The bill now goes to the U.S. Senate where it will face major challenges and require much advocacy by its supporters.


Update on the CUE-Initiated Educational Technology Resolution, ACR 268

Tony ThurmondOn August 30, 2018, Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 268, by Assembly Members Tony Thurmond (now State Superintendent of Public Instruction), Kevin Mullin, and Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, passed by the State Assembly and Senate. ACR 268 was Chaptered September 11, 2018 as Resolution Chapter 221, Statutes of 2018. ACR 268 was initiated by CUE with support from other California education entities. Assembly Member Thurmond the principal author of ACR 268 recently tweeted:

Integrating technology in K-12 education prepares students for success in college & careers. My ACR 268 was chaptered today and sets CA on the path of leading in education tech. It makes educational technology a state priority and calls for a state summit to develop new legislative budget proposals.

With the new State leadership there will be an opportunity to establish new plans and initiatives to address new priorities in many areas and especially education. We are collaborating with State Superintendent Thurmond and his staff as well as the CA State Board of Education and Governor Newsom’s staff, regarding next steps and actions needed to implement ACR 268 recommendations. The Resolution is clear evidence that the State Legislature has made a formal commitment to making educational technology support and access a major priority. We are now establishing a small committee to begin planning for an Educational Technology Summit as recommended in ACR 268, to establish future priorities for education and technology with recommendations for legislation and related funding. More details about ACR 268 will be reported in future updates. For more details about ACR 268 and other bills and resolutions initiated and/or supported by CUE click here.  For the full text of ACR 268 click here.


New California bills to consider

The following bills were introduced in the California Legislature over the past three months. These bills are reported if they generally relate to the CUE Advocacy Platform. Most bills will be amended several times as they pass through various committees. Now is the time to review bills of interest and take positions and/or suggest amendments. We will monitor each of these bills and any other new bills that are of interest to CUE. To review all bills being introduced this session click here.

AB 52, Assembly Member Mark Berman, Computer science strategic implementation plan. Existing law, until July 31, 2020, requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to convene a computer science strategic implementation advisory panel with a specified membership to develop and submit recommendations for a computer science strategic implementation plan to the Superintendent, the State Board of Education, and the Legislature. This bill would require the computer science strategic implementation plan to be updated every 7 years. The bill also would make these provisions apply indefinitely.

  • Status: Passed Assembly Education Committee, Ayes: 6; Noes: 0; Abstain: 0

AB 20, Assembly Member Mark Berman. Computer science strategic implementation plan: California Computer Science Coordinator. This bill would create the California Computer Science Coordinator in the State Department of Education to provide statewide coordination in implementing the computer science strategic implementation plan once it has been adopted by the state board and submitted to the Legislature.

  • Status: Assembly Education Committee, Ayes: 6; Noes: 0; Abstain: 0

AB 578, Assembly Member, Kevin Mullin, The California STEM Professional Teaching Pathway Act of 2019. This bill would establish the California STEM Professional Teaching Pathway for purposes of recruiting, training, supporting, and retaining qualified science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals as mathematics and science teachers in California. This bill would appropriate $2,000,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Education for the 2019–20 fiscal year for purposes of the bill, to be allocated as a one-time grant to a postsecondary educational institution, nonprofit public benefit corporation, county office of education, or a partnership of multiple organizations of these types.

  • Status: assigned to Assembly Education Committee

AB 1336 AB 1366, Assembly Member, Lorena Gonzalez. Voice over Internet Protocol and Internet Protocol enabled communications services. This bill would require that no department, agency, commission, or political subdivision of the state shall enact, adopt, or enforce any law, rule, regulation, ordinance, standard, order, or other provision having the force or effect of law, that regulates VoIP or other IP enabled service,

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) states that this bill abandons oversight over broadband band monopolies. The recently introduced A.B. 1366 mirrors the FCC’s abandonment of consumers with one exception—California fought to establish its own net neutrality rules under S.B. 822 passed last year. Apart from that, A.B. 1366 removes any semblance of the state promoting competition for broadband access through its state regulator, the California Public Utility Commission (the state version of an FCC). Instead, it appears to just hope that our cable monopolies will be benevolent.

  • Status: Assigned to Assembly Communications and Conveyance Committee

SB 2, Senators Glazer and Allen, Statewide Longitudinal Student-Database. Existing law establishes the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System, which maintains pupil data regarding demographic, program participation, enrollment, and statewide assessments. This bill would express the intent of the Legislature to establish the Statewide Longitudinal Student-Database to collect and store data regarding individual students as they matriculate through P–20, as defined, and into the workforce. The bill would require the commission to convene a review committee for purposes of advising the commission on the establishment, implementation, funding, and ongoing administration of the database. The bill would express the intent of the Legislature that the development of the database be substantially completed on or before July 1, 2022. The bill would prohibit the commission from implementing the database if there is a determination, after consultation with the review committee, that the commission is unable to obtain necessary, reliable, and relevant data or protect individual privacy rights and confidentiality of the data.

  • Status: Senate Appropriations Committee: Ayes: 7; Noes: 0; Abstain: 0

AB 1409, Assembly Member, Ed Chau. California Teleconnect Fund Administrative Committee Fund: homework gap projects. Existing law requires the PUC to develop, implement, and administer a program to advance universal service by providing discounted rates to qualifying schools, community colleges, libraries, hospitals, health clinics, and community organizations. This bill, would establish a program to support elementary and high school pupils with after school access to broadband, to include service to schools, community colleges, libraries, hospitals, health clinics, and community organizations, through the fund for homework gap projects.

  • Status: Assigned to Assembly Communications and Conveyance Committee

AB 1303, Assembly Member, O’Donnell. California Career Technical Education Incentive Grant Program: Strong Workforce Program. This bill would terminate the appropriation for the K-12 component of the Strong Workforce Program after the 2018-19 fiscal year and instead specify that, upon appropriation by the Legislature, $450,000,000 shall be made available for the California Career Technical Education Incentive Grant (CTEIG) Program to CDE for the 2018–19 fiscal year and each fiscal year thereafter. The bill would also add regional occupational centers or programs operated by county offices of education (COEs) to the entities authorized to be grant recipients under the program and, commencing with the 2019-20 fiscal year, reduce the required match from a grant recipient to a 1:1 match.

  • Status: assigned to Assembly Education Committee

AB 39 Assembly Members, Muratsuchi and McCarty. Local control funding formula funding increase. This bill would specify new, higher base grant amounts for the 2019–20 fiscal year, which would also increase the supplemental and concentration grant amounts and result in various other changes to funding calculations for purposes of the local control funding formula.

This is a new bill that ACSA is advocating amendments to add new targets for LCFF funding. An example could be to set aside funding the use of technology to support the overall Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP).

  • Status: Assigned to Assembly Education Committee

AB 488, Assembly Member. Cecilia Aguiar-Curry. California Broadband Council. Existing law establishes the California Broadband Council in state government for the purpose of promoting broadband deployment in unserved and underserved areas of the state and broadband adoption throughout the state, imposes specified duties on the council relating to that purpose, and specifies the membership of the council. This bill would add the Secretary of Food and Agriculture, or the secretary’s designee, to the membership of the council.

SB 37, Assembly Member, Nancy Skinner. Corporate tax rates increased to benefit schools: This bill would increase the corporate income tax rate of the largest, most profitable corporations, and progressively increase the corporate tax rates on companies with large disparities between CEO pay and the pay of the average employee of the company. As stated in the bill it would “allow California to better fund its schools, early childhood care and education programs.”

  • Status: being introduced

CUE Advocacy Strategy: As opportunities arise, CUE continues to be proactive in the development, co-development, sponsorship, and support of state and Federal legislation and resolutions which are consistent with the CUE Legislative Advocacy Platform. The CUE Legislative Advocacy Committee (LAC) meets periodically to take positions on relevant bills, resolutions, policies, and other related actions suggested by the CUE Legislative Consultant, Board Members, staff, and Committee members. Anyone who is interested in being involved in supporting the CUE advocacy effort should contact Mary Kopp, CUE Senior Program Manager, mkopp@cue.org or John Cradler, cradler@earthlink.net For earlier Legislative Updates, click here.  

CUE Legislative Update – January 2019

Legislative Advocacy

Tony Thurmond Becomes State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Tony Thurmond sworn inTony Thurmond, educator and public school parent, and recent Assembly Member, took his oath of office as California’s twenty-eighth State Superintendent of Public Instruction Monday, January 7, saying that it is an honor to lead the state’s 6.2 million students and over 10,000 schools. Thurmond was sworn in by retired Alameda County Superior Court Judge Gordon Baranco. Thurmond’s plan for improving schools includes lifting California from the bottom end of per student spending to the top end. “Providing more money to our schools helps our students, our communities, and our economy. But most of all it helps create a bright future for our state,” he said.

The swearing-in ceremony was headed by Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon. It featured remarks from Congresswomen Barbara Lee and leaders of legislative caucuses representing diverse communities of California. CUE was represented at the Inauguration by John and Ruthmary Cradler. At the event we talked to prior State Superintendents Bill Honig, Delaine Eastin, Tom Torlakson, current State Board of Education members and others from the CDE. We also had an opportunity to talk to the new Deputy Superintendent, Lupita Alcala, and Mary Nicely, Special Projects Director, about ACR 268 and some of the future plans.

For details click here for the press release from the CDE.


Lupita Cortez Alcalá Sworn in as Chief Deputy Superintendent of Public Instruction

Lupita Cortez Alcala sworn inLupita Cortez Alcalá was sworn in as Chief Deputy to California State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tony Thurmond on Wednesday, January 9, at the State Board of Education meeting after the board approved her appointment. She will be the first Latina to serve in the position. Cortez Alcalá served for more than 12 years at the California Department of Education, where she was Deputy Superintendent in the Teaching and Learning Support Branch. During her tenure, Cortez Alcalá oversaw the creation of the English Learner Division, revamped the migrant education program, initiated the Seal of Biliteracy to recognize students fluent in two or more languages, and oversaw the development of the English language arts/English language development framework and standards. For details, go to the CDE press release here.


Governor Newsom’s Proposed 2019-2020 State Budget

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond today praised Governor Gavin Newsom’s proposed budget for fiscal year 2019–20. “Governor Newsom hit a home run in his first budget in education and across the board. The budget is thoughtful and balanced and makes good use of public funds, but it is appropriately aggressive in its focus on helping Californians who need it most,” he said. Governor Newsom proposed increasing K–12 education funding by $2.3 billion, investing $1.8 billion in early education, and providing $3.7 billion to help all districts deal with rising pension costs, which are stressing budgets of districts throughout the state. The pension aspect of his budget includes a proposed a one-time $3 billion contribution to CalSTRS and $700 million in each of fiscal year 2019–20 and 2020–21 to reduce the rates districts are charged for their employees’ pensions.

The proposed budget will be revised based on new legislation and recommendations from the Legislature by May 15th. After additional changes, the final budget will be signed sometime in July 2019. To read the proposed budget click here.


Delaine Eastin is Optimistic about Newson Administration and Education’s Future

Delaine EastinMany of you know I ran for governor in part because of my concerns about our lack of investment in education and the lack of focus on the youngest among us. As I have said for 40 years, budgets are statements of values. The focus on education, from preschool through higher education, children, low income families, healthcare, mental health, housing and the homeless in Gavin Newsom first budget makes me optimistic about this administration and the future of California. This is what investing in the future should look like.

Delaine is now a member of Governor Newson’s Transition Team and in a position to advise on education and educational technology. Delaine has agreed to participate in the planning for the California Educational Technology Summit with CUE leadership as recommended in ACR 268.


Update on the CUE Initiated Educational Technology Resolution

On August 30, 2018, Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 268, by Assembly Members Tony Thurmond (now State Superintendent), Kevin Mullin, and Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, passed by the State Assembly and Senate. ACR 268 was Chaptered September 11, 2018 as Resolution Chapter 221, Statutes of 2018. ACR 268 was initiated by Computer Using Educators (CUE) with support from other education entities. Assembly Member Thurmond, the principal author of ACR 268 recently tweeted:

Integrating technology in K-12 education prepares students for success in college & careers. My ACR 268 was chaptered today and sets CA on the path of leading in education tech. It makes educational technology a state priority and calls for a state summit to develop new legislative budget proposals.

With the new State leadership there will be an opportunity to establish new plans and initiatives to address new priorities in many areas and especially education. The next step is to work with State Superintendent Thurmond, in his new role, to enable the State Board of Education and Governor Newson to become familiar with ACR 268 and to understand that the State Legislature has made a formal commitment to making educational technology support and access a major priority. We are now establishing a planning team to begin planning for an Educational Technology Summit as recommended in ACR 268, to establishing priorities for education and technology with recommendations for legislation and related funding. More details about ACR 268 can be found in the November 28th edition of the Legislative Update. For the full text of ACR 268 click here.


Retiring State Board Chair Suggests Funding for Teacher Training

Michael Kirst retires after eight years as president of the State Board of Education, satisfied that the key pieces of Gov. Jerry Brown’s education policies he helped create are solidly in place. But in an interview, he expressed worry that a failure to sufficiently fund training for teachers and principals in the new academic standards, school climate and other supports for students could undermine expectations for achievement and erode the public’s faith in the new system. His comment suggests possible renewed interest in supporting legislation and related State funding for teacher professional development which is a top priority for CUE as stated in the CUE Advocacy Platform and in the Resolution – ACR 268.


Action on prior legislation reported in CUE Legislative Updates

California Net Neutrality Legislation (SB 822) Signed by the Governor: The Net Neutrality for California bill, SB 822 by Senator Scott Wiener, Senator Kevin de Leon, Senator Jerry Hill, Assembly Member Kevin Mullin, and 19 other co-authors to enact the California Internet Consumer Protection and Net Neutrality Act of 2018, passed both houses and was signed by Governor Brown on September 30th. Several of our Congressional Delegation strongly supported this State initiative including U.S. Congressional Representatives, Nancy Pelosi, Ana Eshoo, and Senator Dianne Feinstein. CUE was a major and active supporter of this bill and had sponsored AJR 7 by Kevin Mullin, the net neutrality resolution that led to the introduction of SB 822.

Scott Wiener stated: We passed the strongest net neutrality standards in the nation. This is about a level playing field and an Internet where we as individuals get to decide where we go on the Internet instead of being told by Internet service providers, or manipulated by Internet service providers, into going where they want us to go.

Implementation of SB 822: Now that the bill has passed, it is being challenged by the American Cable Association (and others) in the U.S. District Court for California and will be considered during January/February 2019. Meanwhile, over 20 other states are introducing and passing similar legislation and related resolutions. Also, now that Democrats control the U.S. Congress, there is a possibility that Federal Legislation can be moved forward to re-instate net neutrality at the Federal level. The advocacy groups include the National Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), CoSN, ISTE, and others, continue to advocate for both State and Federal net neutrality legislation. Additionally, FCC Commissioner, Jessica Rosenworcel, (former CUE advocacy award recipient) continues to advocate for restoration of net neutrality as evidenced by her Tweet:

California Governor Jerry Brown just signed a net neutrality bill. A hefty thank you to the Golden State for your effort to get right what the FCC got so wrong when it rolled back open Internet protections late last year. The fight to save net neutrality continues!

CUE continues to monitor and actively support potential Federal legislation and efforts to restore net neutrality.

SB 830-Media Literacy Bill Signed and Chaptered: This bill would require, on or before July 1, 2019, the California Department of Education to make available to school districts on its Internet Web site a list of resources and instructional materials on media literacy, as defined, including media literacy professional development programs for teachers. According to SB 830, “Digital citizenship” means a diverse set of skills related to current technology and social media, including the norms of appropriate, responsible, and healthy behavior. “Media literacy” means the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and use media and encompasses the foundational skills that lead to digital citizenship. This bill was signed by the Governor on September 17, 2018. To read SB 830 (Section 51206.4 to the Education Code, relating to pupil instruction) click here.


CUE Legislator and Advocates of the Year Awards

CUE team visits Advocates of the Year in SacramentoBecause of his dedication to education and serving as Principal Author of the CUE Initiated Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR 268). Former Assembly Member and now State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tony Thurmond was selected to receive the CUE Legislator of the Year Award. It is planned that he will attend the CUE Spring Conference to receive his award.

The Advocate of the Year Award will be presented to two of Senator Scott Wiener’s staff for their work with the Senator and with many organizations (including CUE) to on processing SB 822, the Net Neutrality legislation through the various committees until signed the Governor. CUE Staff will deliver the award Advocacy Awards to Brayden Borcherding and Aria Ghafari at the State Capitol.


CUE Advocacy Strategy: As opportunities arise, CUE continues to be proactive in the development, co-development, sponsorship, and support of state and Federal legislation and resolutions which are consistent with the CUE Legislative Advocacy Platform. The CUE Legislative Advocacy Committee (LAC) meets periodically to take positions on relevant bills, resolutions, policies, and other related actions suggested by the CUE Legislative Consultant, Board Members, staff, and Committee members. Anyone who is interested in being involved in supporting the CUE advocacy effort should contact Mary Kopp, CUE Senior Program Manager, mkopp@cue.org or John Cradler, cradler@earthlink.net For earlier Legislative Updates, click here.  

CUE Legislative Update – December 2018

Legislative Advocacy

CUE Hosts Fall CUE Forum for State Superintendent of Public Instruction (SSPI) Candidates: After much planning with several challenges, the CUE staff organized a public forum at the Fall CUE Conference which provided an Tony Thurmond interviewed by CUE Live! host Kristina Mattisopportunity for Marshall Tuck and Tony Thurmond, the two candidates for SSPI, to be interviewed and answer audience-submitted questions. Each candidate was also interviewed for CUE Live. On CUE Live, Tony Thurmond mentioned ACR 268, the CUE-sponsored Educational Technology Resolution which he authored.

Both candidates focused on their intentions to address the lack of education funding. Thurmond focused on expanding support for pre-school and professional development and promised to proactively work with the State Legislature and Congress. Authoring the Educational Technology Resolution (ACR 268) is clear evidence of his support for educational technology. Tuck referred to his experience with the Los Angeles Charter Schools and focused on partnerships with business and industry to support education.

Assembly Member Tony Thurmond is the new California SSPI: Assemblyman Tony Thurmond won the race for SSPI, defeating Marshall Tuck in the nonpartisan contest. Thurmond is one-term Assembly Member Tony Thurmond greets students at Fall CUErepresenting parts of Oakland and other East Bay communities. A social worker by training, he ran several nonprofits serving children before turning to political office. He served on both the board of the West Contra Costa Unified School District and on the Richmond City Council. He was backed by the California Teachers Association (CTA) and other labor unions representing educators and university faculty. CTA president Eric Heins said, “electing Gavin Newsom governor and Thurmond state superintendent were the top priority for CTA. “It’s clear that educators played a pivotal role in this election,” pointing to phone banking, door-to-door canvassing and other activities by CTA members on behalf of Thurmond.

The CUE-Sponsored Educational Technology Assembly Resolution: On August 30, 2018, Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 268, by Assembly Members Tony Thurmond, Kevin Mullin, and Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, passed both the California State Assembly and Senate. ACR 268 was Chaptered on September 11, 2018 as Resolution Chapter 221, Statutes of 2018. ACR 268 was initiated by CUE with support from other education entities. CUE Legislative Consultant, John Cradler, prepared ACR 268 with input from, the California Department of Education, CUE leadership, the California Emerging Technology Fund, and Napa County Superintendent of Schools, Barbara Nemko.

Assembly Member Thurmond, the principal author of ACR 268 recently tweeted:

Integrating technology in K-12 education prepares students for success in college & careers. My ACR 268 was chaptered today and sets CA on the path of leading in education tech. It makes educational technology a state priority and calls for a state summit to develop new legislative budget proposals.

ACR 268 identifies 17 critical needs, ranging from professional development to technology access, to be made available on an equitable basis to all regions of the State. Many of the needs listed in the Resolution were based on the California Educational Technology Blueprint initiated by State Superintendent Tom Torlakson in 2011 known as A Blueprint for Great Schools. The intent of ACR 268 is for the Legislature to encourage the new State Superintendent of Public Instruction, the Governor, the State Board of Education, with support from the California Legislature, to move forward with a comprehensive educational technology plan with recommended policies, legislation, and State and/or Federal funding as needed. For the full text of ACR 268 see page 4 & 5 of this report or click this link.

Implementing the Recommendations of ACR 268: With the new State leadership there will be a need and an opportunity to establish new plans and initiatives to address priorities in many areas and especially education. The next step is to work with State Superintendent Thurmond, in his new role, to enable the State Board of Education and Governor Newson become familiar with ACR 268 and to understand that the State Legislature has made a formal commitment to making educational technology support and access a major priority. Conducting an educational technology summit in 2019, as resolved by ACR 268, will be the first step in establishing a State plan for implementing policies, programs, needed funding, and possibly legislation to ensure that the priorities established by ACR 268 and the existing Blueprint for Educational Technology are implemented. Some of the next steps for implementing ACR 268 are as follows:

  1. Survey CUE membership regarding priorities for education technology.
  2. Conduct a CUE Spring Conference session to obtain input from CUE members.
  3. Identify partner entities to work with CUE to plan and co-sponsor the Summit for Fall of 2019.
  4. Work with Superintendent Thurmond to engage the State Board and Governor.
  5. Identify and invite State legislators to actively participate in the Summit.
  6. Identify possible legislation and policies to be supported in the Summit.
  7. Expand the ACR 268 priorities to incorporate CUE-survey findings.
  8. Discuss effective programs documenting evidence of effective educational uses of technology.
  9. Determine who to invite to the Summit.
  10. Prepare a Plan that defines how technology is incorporated into California education.
  11. Ensure that the press publicizes Summit recommendations and actions to be taken.
  12. Plan follow-up to enable implementation of Summit recommendations.

The anticipated 2019 Educational Technology Summit could be modeled after the 1991 Educational Technology Summit which was a major factor in the development of SB 1510, in 1992 by Senator Becky Morgan and Assembly Member Sam Farr, which defined and authorized funding for CTAP, SETS, Model Technology Schools, and School-Based Grants. CUE leadership and members played a major role, with partners including CTA, CFT, CSBA, and others, in helping to establish and participate in this Summit. You can watch a short, professionally produced two-part video of the 1991 summit on YouTube: Part 1 is here and Part 2 is here.

ACTION UPDATES

California Net Neutrality Legislation (SB 822) Signed by the Governor: The Net Neutrality for California bill, SB 822 by Senator Scott Wiener, Senator Kevin deLeon, Senator Jerry Hill, Assembly Member Kevin Mullin, and 19 other co-authors to enact the California Internet Consumer Protection and Net Neutrality Act of 2018, Senator Scott Wiener speaks to the importance of SB 822passed both houses and was signed by Governor Brown on September 30, 2018. SB 822 is the first major State level, net neutrality legislation and has evolved as a model for at least 30 other states. Several of our Congressional Delegation strongly supported this State initiative including U.S. Congressional Representatives, Nancy Pelosi, Ana Eshoo, and Senator Dianne Feinstein.

Almost every major newspaper has publicized the passing of SB 822 as a major effort to restore net neutrality. As mentioned in prior Legislative Updates, CUE was a major and active supporter of this bill and had sponsored AJR 7 by Kevin Mullin, the net neutrality resolution that led to the introduction of SB 822. Scott Wiener stated:

We passed the strongest net neutrality standards in the nation. This is about a level playing field and an Internet where we as individuals get to decide where we go on the Internet instead of being told by Internet service providers, or manipulated by Internet service providers, into going where they want us to go.

Implementation of SB 822: Now that the bill has passed, it is being challenged by the American Cable Association (and others) in the U.S. District Court for California and will be considered during January/February 2019. Meanwhile, over 20 other States are introducing and passing similar legislation and related resolutions. Also, now that Democrats control the U.S. Congress, there is a possibility that Federal Legislation can be moved forward to re-instate net neutrality at the Federal level. The advocacy groups include the National Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), CoSN, ISTE, and others, continue to advocate for both State and Federal net neutrality legislation. Additionally, FCC Commissioner, Jessica Rosenworcel, (former CUE advocacy award recipient) continues to advocate for restoration of net neutrality as evidenced by her tweet:

California Governor Jerry Brown just signed a net neutrality bill. A hefty thank you to the Golden State for your effort to get right what the FCC got so wrong when it rolled back open Internet protections late last year. The fight to save net neutrality continues!

CUE will continue to monitor and actively support potential Federal legislation and efforts to restore net neutrality.

SB 830-Media Literacy Bill Signed and Chaptered: CUE is a major supporter of SB 830 by Senator Dodd, which would establish and fund implementation of new State Curriculum standards and guidelines related to media literacy and digital citizenship. This bill would require, on or before July 1, 2019, the California Department of Education (CDE) to make available to school districts on its website a list of resources and instructional materials on media literacy, as defined, including media literacy professional development programs for teachers. According to SB 830, “Digital citizenship” means a diverse set of skills related to current technology and social media, including the norms of appropriate, responsible, and healthy behavior. “Media literacy” means the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and use media and encompasses the foundational skills that lead to digital citizenship. This bill passed both the Assembly and Senate and was signed by the Governor on September 17, 2018.

Implementation of SB 830: We will be collaborating with the CDE to identify ways that CUE can contribute to planning for the implementation of SB 830. For example, CUE may be able to contribute content to the CDE SB 830 website and advise on its development. Media literacy is clearly a component in AJR 268 and is mentioned in the CUE Legislative Platform.

CUE Advocacy Strategy: As opportunities arise, CUE continues to be proactive in the development, co-development, and sponsorship of state and Federal legislation and resolutions. The CUE Legislative Advocacy Committee (LAC) meets monthly to take positions on relevant bills and other related actions suggested by the CUE legislative consultants and the committee members. Anyone who is interested in being involved in supporting the CUE advocacy effort should contact Mary Kopp, CUE Senior Program Manager, mkopp@cue.org or John Cradler, cradler@earthlink.net.

To sign up for breaking legislative advocacy news and updates, subscribe to our email list by signing up here: cue.org/leg-updates.

CUE Legislative Update – September 2018

Legislative Advocacy

CUE-Supported Educational Technology Resolution and Net Neutrality, and Media Literacy Legislation Passed by the California Assembly and Senate

Assembly Member Tony Thurmond

Assembly Member Tony Thurmond

CUE Sponsored Educational Technology Resolution (ACR 268): On Thursday, August 30th ACR 268, by Assembly Members Tony Thurmond (photo), Kevin Mullin, and Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, passed the California State Assembly Floor and then on Friday, August 31st, the Resolution passed the Senate Floor. This is the Educational Technology Resolution initiated by CUE with support from other education entities.

The CUE Legislative Consultant, John Cradler prepared ACR 268 with input from, the California Department of Education, CUE leadership, and Napa County Superintendent, Barbara Nemko. Assembly Member Tony Thurmond and his staff member, Michael Lucian, did much to move the Resolution to the Assembly Education Committee, Assembly Appropriations, and then to the Floor of both the Assembly and Senate where it passed.

AJR 268 identifies 17 needs, ranging from professional development to technical assistance, that should be made available on an equitable basis to all regions of the State. Many of the needs listed in the Resolution were based on the California Educational Technology Blueprint initiated by State Superintendent Tom Torlakson, in 2011 known as A Blueprint for Great Schools. The major intent of ACR 268 is for the Legislature to encourage the new State Superintendent of Public Instruction, the Governor, the State Board of Education, with support from the California Legislature, to move forward with a comprehensive educational technology plan with recommended legislation and funding as needed. The Resolution recommends that:

The Legislature consider education technology of the highest priority and support providing all California educators and students with state of the art technology resources, connectivity, and related support needed to enable the use of technology to expand and optimize instruction and learning opportunities for all students.

provided testimony with other CUE representatives attending to testify

On August 15th, CUE Leadership traveled to the Capitol to meet with Legislators and their staff members to explain the purpose and need for ACR 268 and attend the Assembly Education Committee hearing to testify in support of ACR 268, where the initial vote was taken to approve the resolution. Jon Corrippo, CUE Executive Director, and John Cradler, provided testimony with other CUE representatives attending to testify if needed. Others included Kim Evans-Harrison, Mary Kopp, Ruthmary Cradler, and John Fleischman.

After being introduced and approved by the Assembly Education Committee, Assembly Member Thurmond issued a press release found at: https://a15.asmdc.org/press-releases/20180815-thurmonds-resolution-expand-technology-students-and-teachers-passes When time for ACR 268 to be presented to the Senate Floor it was necessary for Assembly Member Thurmond to ask a Senator to support and present the Resolution. Senator Jerry Hill agreed and his Senate presentation can be viewed by clicking on: https://vimeo.com/288052203.

For ACR 268 text and updates, go to California Legislative Information:  http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billVotesClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180ACR268

California Net Neutrality Legislation (SB 822): After several amendments and extensive debate, the Net Neutrality for California bill, SB 822 by Senator Scott Wiener, et al., passed the Assembly Floor and then on August 31st it passed the Senate Floor and is now on its way to the Governor for his signature. The Governor has until Sept. 30th to sign the bill. SB 822 is the first major State level, net neutrality legislation and has evolved as a model for at least 30 other States. Several of our Congressional Delegation strongly supported this State initiative including U.S. Congressional Representatives, Nancy Pelosi, Ana Eshoo, and Senator Dianne Feinstein. Almost every major newspaper has publicized the passing of SB 822 as a major effort to restore net neutrality. The Principal Author of the bill, Scott Wiener stated the following:

We passed the strongest net neutrality standards in the nation. This is about a level playing field and an Internet where we as individuals get to decide where we go on the Internet instead of being told by Internet service providers, or manipulated by Internet service providers, into going where they want us to go.

CUE played an important role in this legislation by sponsoring, last year, the net neutrality Assembly Joint Resolution (AJR 7), by California Assembly Member Kevin Mullin, asking the US Congress and the POTUS to restore net neutrality. AJR 7 served to inform many of the California Legislators about the need to restore net neutrality and prompted interest in the development of California Legislation that would establish net neutrality for California. We were assisted and supported by FCC Commissioner, Jessica Rosenworcel (photo) in developing and processing AJR 7. We then elicited her assistance to advise Senator Wiener in the development of SB 822.  Last year, Jessica attended the Spring CUE conference to receive the CUE Legislative Advocacy Award for her role in establishing the net neutrality rules as an FCC Commissioner when Obama was President.

FCC Commissioner, Jessica Rosenworcel

FCC Commissioner, Jessica Rosenworcel

CUE provided written support, testimony at Assembly and Senate hearings, and met with targeted Senators to explain the relevance of net neutrality to education and relate SB 822 to the previous CUE-sponsored net neutrality resolution. U. S. Congress Member, Anna Eshoo (San Jose) reported that AJR 7 made it possible to clearly state that the California Legislature supports net neutrality which reinforced her effort to introduce a Federal bill to restore net neutrality.

For SB 822 text and updates, go to California Legislative Information: http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180SB822

Media Literacy Legislation (SB 830): CUE is a major supporter of SB 830 which would establish and fund implementation of new State Curriculum standards and guidelines related to media literacy and digital citizenship. This bill passed both the Assembly and Senate and is awaiting the Governor’s signature. To read the SB 830 text and or updates, go to: http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180SB830

CUE Advocacy Strategy

As opportunities arise, CUE continues to be proactive in the development, co-development, and sponsorship of state and Federal legislation and resolutions. The CUE Legislative Advocacy Committee (LAC) meets monthly to take positions on relevant bills and other related actions suggested by the CUE Legislative Consultants and the Committee members.  Anyone who is interested in being involved in supporting the CUE advocacy effort should contact Mary Kopp, CUE Senior Program Manager, mkopp@cue.org or John Cradler, cradler@earthlink.net.

CUE Legislative Update – July 2018

social justice

California Senate votes to establish net neutrality

State Senator Scott Wiener introduced SB 822 to establish California net neutrality rules and policies to take the place of the repealed Federal net neutrality rules. SB 822 states the intent is to: enact legislation to effectuate net neutrality in California utilizing the state’s regulatory powers and to prevent Internet service providers from engaging in practices inconsistent with net neutrality. His introduction of SB 822 was, in part motivated by the CUE-sponsored resolution (AJR7) asking the U.S. Congress and President to restore net neutrality as well as preserving Life Line and E-Rate. Senator Wiener and all of the SB822 co-authors had previously signed on as co-authors of AJR7.

Photo shows Assembly Member Santiago and Senator Wiener.

Photo shows Assembly Member Santiago and Senator Wiener.

Current Status of SB 822: On May 30th the California State Senate voted 22 to 12 to approve SB 822. The bill then proceeded to the Assembly Communications and Conveyance Committee where it was unexpectedly amended by Assembly Member Miguel Santiago before it could be presented by Senator Wiener and allow for witnesses to testify. The amendment “gutted” the major components of the bill so than it would no longer protect net neutrality. We were asked by Senator Wiener to oppose the version of the bill with the Santiago amendment and support the original version in our testimony at the hearing. After several days of heated negotiation and discussion along with intervention from U.S. Senator Pelosi, other U.S. representatives, and the public, Santiago reversed his position and agreed to remove the destructive amendment.  After Santiago reversed his position he agreed to become a co-to author and vocal supporter of the original bill along with Senator Wiener, Senator Dodd, Assembly Member Kevin Mullin and others. Go to the following link to an SF Chronicle article for more details: https://www.sfchronicle.com/business/article/Wiener-Santiago-reach-deal-on-California-net-13051370.php

Next, SB822 must be heard by the Assembly Appropriations Committee, the Assembly Floor, and if approved goes to the Governor for his signature during August when the Legislature re-convenes. CUE will continue to work with the net neutrality consortia to support the bill as it proceeds through the State Assembly. CUE has submitted support letters for SB822 and will be working to help get the needed votes to move the bill through the next hurdles. For bill status, schedule, and current text, go to: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180SB822.

Action to be taken by CUE: Anticipated actions by CUE would be to: 1) encourage CUE members contact members of the State Assembly urging support for SB 822, 2) update and distribute SB 822 support letters from CUE, and 3) provide testimony to support SB 822 before the Assembly Appropriations Committee in August. Details such as names of Assembly Members to target, hearing schedules, and timing and guidance for support letters will be provided by Senator Wiener’s staff during the next few weeks.

U.S. House and Senate legislation introduce legislation to reinstate net neutrality

Democratic leaders in the House and Senate introduced legislation to reinstate the Federal Communications Commission’s net neutrality rules regulating Internet service providers. The Open Internet Preservation Act was introduced by Reps. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif., and Henry Waxman, D-Calif. — members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee — with a companion bill introduced by Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass. The bill would reinstate the FCC’s “open Internet” order prohibiting Internet providers from blocking or discriminating against Web traffic. The House bill will be joined to net neutrality legislation already passed by the Senate, authored by Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.). Congresswoman Eshoo said in a joint statement.  This bill ensures that consumers, not their Internet service provider, are in the driver’s seat when it comes to their online experience.

Co-sponsors of the legislation include Reps. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., Doris Matsui, D-Calif., and Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Al Franken, D-Minn.

Media Literacy Legislation passed the State Senate

SB 830, by Senator Dodd and Principal Co-Author Assembly Member Mullin would require the State Curriculum Commission to develop, and the state board to adopt, reject, or modify, a model media literacy curriculum for kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive, for voluntary use by educators. The bill would require the Commission to submit the model digital literacy curriculum to the state board on or before January 1,2023, and would require the state board to adopt, reject, or modify the model curriculum on or before March 31,2023, in accordance with specified procedural requirements. SB 830 focuses on “digital citizenship” and “media literacy” which are broad terms that encompass consumption and use of media and digital products defined as follows:

  1. Digital citizenship means a diverse set of skills related to current technology and social media, including the norms of appropriate, responsible, and healthy behavior.
  2. Media literacy means the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and use media and encompasses the foundational skills that lead to digital citizenship.

SB 830 specifies: The Instructional Quality Commission shall develop, and the state board shall adopt, reject, or modify, a model curriculum in media literacy for kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive, for voluntary use by educators. The model curriculum in media literacy shall be designed for the purpose of providing instruction in the safe and responsible use of media and supporting pupils’ use of critical thinking skills when consuming media. The State Department of Education would be required to make available on its website a list of resources and instructional materials on media literacy, including media literacy professional development programs for teachers.

Current Status of SB 830: On June 27, the bill passed the Assembly Education Committee 5 to 0, and moves to the Assembly Appropriations Committee in August. SB 830 already had passed the Senate Floor, 12 to 11. For details go to: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180SB830

Action Needed: CUE has provided a support letter and have also met with the Author’s staff to express support as well as meeting with the legislative advocate for the California School Library Association–the primary sponsor of the bill. It is anticipated that testimony may be desired from CUE and a follow-up support letter.

CUE Initiates an Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) to make Educational Technology a high priority

As discussed in the last Update and at a prior CUE Board Meeting, CUE initiated a resolution that would declare that the Legislature strongly support specific guidelines, incentives, and funding, as needed, for the development and implementation of an educational technology plan. Such a plan would provide for K- 12 school districts, in concert with California Department of Education (CDE) County Offices of Education (COE), sufficient professional development and support needed for teachers to effectively utilize digital resources in support of State adopted Curriculum Frameworks. It also addresses the establishment and implementation of Computer Science, Digital Media, Internet Safety, and Digital Citizenship Standards, home technology access to the high-speed Internet, and other related resources and policies. The ACR does the following as stated in the Legislative Council Digest:

  1. This measure would provide that the Legislature considers education technology to be of the highest priority and supports providing all California educators and students with the state of the art technology resources, connectivity, and related support needed to enable the use of technology to expand and optimize instruction and learning opportunities for all students.

  2. This measure would provide that the Legislature, convene a State level summit conference, representing teachers, school administrators, county offices of education, professional education associations, and the California Emerging Technology Fund (CETF), to address the above conditions stated in this resolution; and related topics to establish possible new legislative and funding priorities

  3. This measure would also urge the Legislature and the Governor to take into consideration prior and current educational technology initiatives, programs, and plans to help inform any new legislation and budget changes related to education technology.

Current status: The resolution has been approved by the Assembly Legislative Council and is set to be heard at the next Assembly Education Committee and then it would move to the Assembly Floor sometime in August.

Action Needed: When the ACR is scheduled for the committee hearing will be necessary to provide testimony and a support letter from CUE and other entities.

California Education Budget for 2018-19

The May Revision includes total funding of $96.2 billion ($57.4 billion General Fund and $38.8 billion other funds) for all K-12 education programs. The revision increases Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) by $277 Million. This increase brings the Governor’s total proposed LCFF augmentation in 2018-19 to $3.2 billion. This K-12 school districts will have $6.16 billion more in one-time and ongoing appropriations to spend in 2018-19 than in the current year. That’s more than $1,000 per student. Most of that money will go toward permanently increasing funding for the Local Control Funding Formula, which Gov. Jerry Brown made his funding priority since the Legislature passed the funding formula law in 2013.

While the Governor proposed increased and full funding for LCFF it does not earmark funds specifically for education technology. While it is positive that he increased LCFF, educators will still need to convince their school and district leadership to allocate a portion of the LCFF funding for educational technology and related professional development and technical support. The CUE Educational Technology Resolution (discussed above) addresses the need to make State funding available, based on local needs, for accessing, implementing, and supporting education technology. http://www.ebudget.ca.gov/2018-19/pdf/Revised/BudgetSummary/K-12Education.pdf

Following are a few of the State Budget items that may be applicable to the planning and support for the use of educational technology:

  • Statewide System of Support—$57.8 million Proposition 98 General Fund for county offices of education to provide technical assistance to school districts, of which $4 million will go towards geographical regional leads to build system-wide capacity to support school district improvement.
  • Educator Effectiveness Block Grant—$490 million one-time Proposition 98 General Fund in 2015-16 to support educator professional development.
  • California Educator Development Grant Program—$9 million one-time federal Title II funds in 2017-18 for competitive grants that assist local educational agencies in attracting and supporting the preparation and continued learning of teachers, principals, and other school leaders in high-need subjects and schools.
  • Kids Code After School Program—$15 million one-time Proposition 98 General Fund to increase opportunities for students in after-school programs to access computer coding education.

CUE Advocacy Strategy

As opportunities arise, CUE continues to be proactive in the development, co-development, and sponsorship of state and Federal legislation and resolutions. The CUE Legislative Advocacy Committee (LAC) meets monthly to take positions on relevant bills and other related actions suggested by the CUE Legislative Consultants and the Committee members.  Anyone who is interested in being involved in supporting the CUE advocacy effort should contact Mary Kopp, CUE Senior Program Manager, mkopp@cue.org or John Cradler, cradler@earthlink.net

CUE Legislative Update – June 2018

State Senator Scott Wiener introduced SB 822

California Senate votes to establish net neutrality

Current Status of SB 822: On May 30th the California State Senate voted 22 to 12 to approve SB 822. State Senator Scott Wiener introduced SB 822 to establish California net neutrality rules and policies to take the place of the repealed Federal net neutrality rules. SB 822 states the intent of the Legislation is to: enact legislation to effectuate net neutrality in California utilizing the state’s regulatory powers and to prevent Internet service providers from engaging in practices inconsistent with net neutrality.

SB 822 next proceeds to the Assembly heard by the Assembly Communications and Conveyance Committee and then the Assembly Privacy and Consumer Protection Committee. CUE Legislative Consultant (John Cradler) testified along with representatives of several other entities, at the Senate Appropriations Committee in support of the bill.

CUE representatives John and Ruthmary Cradler and TURN Executive Director Mark Toney, with Senator Weiner at the press conference.

After being voted out of Suspense in the Senate Appropriations Committee, the bill proceeded to the Senate Floor. CUE representatives joined with other members of the neutrality coalition established by Senator Wiener to meet with Senate members and participate in a press conference in an effort to secure sufficient votes to get the bill passed by the Senate. Photos show Senator Weiner and Dodd conducting the press conference and CUE representatives John and Ruthmary Cradler and TURN Executive Director Mark Toney, with Senator Weiner at the press conference.

CUE will continue to work with the net neutrality consortia to support the bill as it proceeds through the State Assembly. CUE has submitted a support letters for SB822 in both the Senate and Assembly. Scott Weiner previously voted to support the CUE-initiated AJR7–net neutrality resolution. Assembly Member Kevin Mullin, the author of AJR7 is a co-author of SB822. It was reported that the CUE–sponsored, AJR7 was a major factor in encouraging Senator Weiner to introduce SB822.

For details go to: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180SB822

Media Literacy Legislation passed the State Senate

SB 830, by Senator Dodd and Principal Co-Author Assembly Member Mullin would require the State Curriculum Commission to develop, and the state board to adopt, reject, or modify, a model curriculum in media literacy for kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive, for voluntary use by educators. The bill would require the Commission to submit the model digital literacy curriculum to the state board on or before January 1,2023, and would require the state board to adopt, reject, or modify the model curriculum on or before March 31,2023, in accordance with specified procedural requirements. SB 830 focuses on “digital citizenship” and “media literacy” which are broad terms that encompass consumption and use of media and digital products defined as follows:

  1. Digital citizenship means a diverse set of skills related to current technology and social media, including the norms of appropriate, responsible, and healthy behavior.
  2. Media literacy means the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and use media and encompasses the foundational skills that lead to digital citizenship.

The Instructional Quality Commission shall develop, and the state board shall adopt, reject, or modify, a model curriculum in media literacy for kindergarten and grades 1 to 12, inclusive, for voluntary use by educators. The model curriculum in media literacy shall be designed for the purpose of providing instruction in the safe and responsible use of media and supporting pupils’ use of critical thinking skills when consuming media. The bill would require the State Department of Education to make available on its website a list of resources and instructional materials on media literacy, including media literacy professional development programs for teachers.

Status of SB 830: On March 14th, the bill passed the Senate Education Committee 4 to 2, and on May 30th it passed the Senate Floor, 12 to 11. Next it will be scheduled to be presented to the Assembly Education Committee. ISTE has suggested some amendments to incorporate the use of ISTE standards which we may consider. For details go to: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billTextClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180SB830

CUE Initiates a Resolution to Increase State Support for Educational Technology

As discussed in the last Update and at the last CUE Board Meeting, CUE initiated a resolution that would declare that the Legislature strongly support, specific guidelines, incentives, and funding, as needed, for the development and implementation of an educational technology plan. Such a plan would provide for K- 12 school districts, in concert with California Department of Education (CDE) County Offices of Education (COE), sufficient professional development and support needed for teachers to effectively utilize digital resources in support of State adopted Curriculum Frameworks. It also addresses the establishment and implementation of Computer Science, Digital Media, Internet Safety, and Digital Citizenship Standards, home technology access to the high-speed Internet, and other related resources and policies.

The resolution would provide an education technology agenda or platform, to be formally supported by the State Legislature, to help inform State education programs, policies, and potential legislation for the future.

Current status: The draft resolution (v.16) has been reviewed by CDE staff and Tom Torlakson, and is ready to be introduced by interested State legislators.

California Governor’s Proposed Budget

The May Revision includes total funding of $96.2 billion ($57.4 billion General Fund and $38.8 billion other funds) for all K-12 education programs. The revision increases Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) by $277 Million. This increase brings the Governor’s total proposed LCFF augmentation in 2018-19 to $3.2 billion. This augmentation is slightly more than needed to reach the LCFF target funding rates. Of the $3.2 billion, $3.1 billion is provided for reaching the target rates and $166 million is provided on top of the target rates (reflecting a 0.3 percent increase). The May Revision proposal effectively serves to provide a larger cost-of-living-adjustment (COLA) to the program (3 percent rather than the statutory COLA rate of 2.71 percent).

While the Governor proposed increased and full funding for LCFF it does not earmark funds specifically for education technology. While it is positive that he increased LCFF, educators will still need to convince their school and district leadership to allocate a portion of the LCFF funding for educational technology and related professional development and technical support. The CUE Educational Technology Resolution (discussed above) adresses the need to make State funding available, based on local needs, for accessing, implementing, and supporting education technology. http://www.ebudget.ca.gov/2018-19/pdf/Revised/BudgetSummary/K-12Education.pdf

CUE Advocacy Strategy

As opportunities arise, CUE continues to be proactive in the development, co-development, and sponsorship of state and Federal legislation and resolutions. The CUE Legislative Advocacy Committee (LAC) meets monthly to take positions on relevant bills and other related actions suggested by the CUE Legislative Consultants and the Committee members.  Anyone who is interested in being involved in supporting the CUE advocacy effort should contact Mary Kopp, CUE Senior Program Manager, mkopp@cue.org or John Cradler, cradler@earthlink.net

The Rise and Fall of Educational Technology Support in California

Over the past 40 years in California, there was a major increase, and then a recent and sudden decline, in support for educational technology. In preparing information for the 40th Anniversary of CUE (Computer Using Educators) and to document the history of legislation, policy, and funding from 1982 until 2014, it became clear that during the past four decades there has been a high level of state and national support for policies, planning, legislation, and funding, for a wide range of educational technology resources and services.

Most of the CUE pioneers who returned to CUE conference this year were involved in implementing a wide variety of initiatives during the past 40 years, including Teacher Education and Computing Centers (TECC), AB 803 School-Based Educational Technology Grants, Model Technology Schools (MTS), Statewide Educational Technology projects, Soft Swap, Software Preview Centers, Instructional Technology Clearinghouse, California Learning Resource Network (CLRN), California Technology Project (CTP), California Technology Assistance Projects (CTAP), CalSAVE, TICAL, Telemation, and more.

In addition to these state-supported initiatives, there were several significant national programs initiated since 1980: a National Office of Educational Technology, a National Educational Technology Plan, a National Director of Educational Technology, Star Schools video-based distance learning projects, Technology Innovation Challenge Grants, Regional Technology Education Centers, Preparing Tomorrows Teachers to Use Technology (PT3) grans, and Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) grants–all of which have recently been terminated.

In conversations with many of the CUE pioneers, it became evident that the opportunities made possible by supplemental funding and programs authorized by legislation provided the time and incentives to be innovative, and for professional growth. This enabled them to get involved in and become leaders in CUE as a place to share and disseminate effective practices and program through CUE-sponsored state and regional conferences and publications. Many state- and federally- funded projects supported the growth of CUE by providing funding to send educators to CUE conferences, furnishing technology support and equipment for CUE conferences, and events co-funded by state-funded projects, content for many presentations and exhibits of promising practices, and co-sponsoring with CUE statewide and regional professional development events. CUE representatives are also involved in state educational technology planning committees and commissions as well as opportunities for legislators to become engaged in educational technology programs and projects made possible through legislation which they had authored or supported.

At the 2018 Spring CUE Conference, many of the pioneers noted the numerous important state and federal initiatives and programs they initiated no longer exist.

Due to both state and national budget cuts, the state and federal funding for educational technology as well as more than 35 other “categorical” programs were eliminated with the funds going directly to schools under the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF).

Over the past three years, CUE has encouraged school districts to incorporate necessary educational resources into their Local Control Accountability Plans (LCAP). A few districts are using LCFF to support local educational technology resource needs. However, most are under pressure to use the funds for salaries, facilities, and other locally determined needs. State and national programs and projects offered a variety of benefits that are not possible with LCFF, including funding and guidelines that support: 1) projects to innovate and test new applications of technology to support teaching and learning; 2) dissemination and local adoptions of effective practices and programs; 3) staff and resources needed to objectively review and align with content standards, and; 4) recommend effective digital instructional resources.

These projects generally resulted in replicable practices that would show significant improvement in teaching and learning by reducing local duplication of effort. Regional services saved significant local funding and equity was addressed because small and rural districts without local resources could apply for categorical project funding for needed technology support and training.  

It is important to mention that nearly all educational programs and projects legislated from 1982 to 2014 were based on well-documented needs determined by surveys of teachers and school administrators, external evaluations of educational program needs, educational research, policy decisions made by legislators, school boards, educational associations, and community organizations.

The State Superintendent’s California Educational Technology Blueprint for 2012 clearly recommended continuing many of the programs and services supported by the previous legislation with modification and expansion to address the Blueprint’s recommendations. At this year’s Spring CUE Conference, there was much discussion the importance of looking at what worked in the past four decades and using that information to help the future of technology in education. Available extensive evaluation data documents the cost-benefits and effectiveness of most of the programs and services previously available to California teachers and administrators.

CUE is helping to fill some of the gaps left by the cuts but cannot offer the millions of dollars and leverage of resources previously available from the state and federal sources, not to mention the current and emerging equity of technology access issues. However, CUE is taking a lead role in actively engaging in activities to support legislation and policies that address the need for support of, and open access to technology to support teaching and learning at school and at home.


John Cradler is a legislative policy consultant with CUE and works with the CUE board, staff and Legislative Advocacy Committee to advise on policy, legislation and other public initiatives to support CUE’s mission and vision. He can be reached at jcradler@cue.org.

 

Expanded Support to Sustain Net Neutrality 

net neutrality

With the FCC plan to eliminate net neutrality heading toward becoming a formal regulation, opponents are now moving on two fronts.  First, 21 states and the District of Columbia filed suit in federal court to block the FCC’s turnabout. In the Senate, Democrats claim to be near the 51-vote tipping point to block the plan. Second, the Internet Association, which represents such as Netflix, Google, Apple, and Facebook, stepped in for the first time to oppose the switch away from net neutrality.

Xavier Becerra, California’s Attorney General joined the nationwide lawsuit, and issued this statement:

The online world should be preserved against imposed fees and limitations. Internet access is a utility — just like water and electricity.  Net neutrality is a guideline that protects all Internet users.

It should be mentioned that we had intended for CUE sponsored, Assembly Joint Resolution No.7 to support making the Internet a public utility as was done in 1934 for telephone service under the Rural Electrification Act. 

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